Table of Contents
ISRN Microbiology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 356451, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/356451
Review Article

Host-Microbe Interactions in Caenorhabditis elegans

Department of Environmental Sciences, School of the Coast and Environment, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA

Received 18 June 2013; Accepted 16 July 2013

Academic Editors: A. Hamood and F. Navarro-Garcia

Copyright © 2013 Rui Zhang and Aixin Hou. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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