Table of Contents
ISRN Psychiatry
Volume 2013, Article ID 414170, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/414170
Research Article

A Multiple Case Series Analysis of Six Variants of Attentional Bias Modification for Depression

1Institute of Psychology, Leiden University, Wassenaarseweg 52, 2333 AK Leiden, The Netherlands
2Department of Psychiatry, Leiden University Medical Center, 2333 ZA Leiden, The Netherlands
3Leiden Institute of Brain and Cognition, 2333 ZA Leiden, The Netherlands

Received 25 December 2012; Accepted 3 February 2013

Academic Editors: M. Z. Dernovsek and L. Tamam

Copyright © 2013 Anne-Wil Kruijt et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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