Table of Contents
ISRN Ecology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 414357, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/414357
Research Article

Forest Structure, Nutrients, and Pentaclethra macroloba Growth after Deforestation of Costa Rican Lowland Forests

School of Environmental and Life Sciences, Kean University, Union, NJ 07083, USA

Received 6 March 2013; Accepted 26 March 2013

Academic Editors: S. Liu and D. Pimentel

Copyright © 2013 Daniela J. Shebitz and William Eaton. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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