Table of Contents
ISRN Oncology
Volume 2013, Article ID 503249, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/503249
Research Article

Esophageal Cancer, the Topmost Cancer at MTRH in the Rift Valley, Kenya, and Its Potential Risk Factors

1Department of Immunology, Moi University, Kenya
2Department of Biochemistry, Moi University, Kenya
3Department of Behavioral Science, Moi University, Kenya
4Imperial College, London, UK

Received 8 September 2013; Accepted 8 October 2013

Academic Editors: S. T. Hedau and Z. Suo

Copyright © 2013 Kirtika Patel et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Esophageal cancer at Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital (MTRH) is the leading cancer in men with a poor prognosis. A case control study aimed at the histology type, gender, and risk indicators was carried out at MTRH. Mantel Haenszel chi-square and logistic regression were employed for analysis. Squamous-cell carcinoma was the common histological type occurring in the middle third portion of the oesophagus. The occurrence of the cancer in males was 1.4 times that of females. The mean age was 56.1 yrs. Low socioeconomic, smoking, snuff use, alcohol, tooth loss, cooking with charcoal and firewood, hot beverage, and use of mursik were independently associated with esophageal cancer . Using logistic regression adjusted for various factors, alcohol consumption was associated with the increased risk of esophageal cancer. AHR was 0.45 and 95% CI: 0.205–0.985, . A societal component of low socioeconomic conditions, a lifestyle component with specific practices such as the consumption of mursik, chang’aa, busaa, snuff, smoking, hot tea, poor oral hygiene, and an environmental component with potential exposure to high levels of nitrosamines, passive smoking, and cooking with coal, could be involved. The increase in experts at MTRH capable of diagnosing could be responsible for the increase in reporting this neoplasm.