Table of Contents
ISRN Family Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 529645, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2013/529645
Research Article

Concurrent and Convergent Validity of the Simple Lifestyle Indicator Questionnaire

Primary Healthcare Research Unit, Discipline of Family Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL, Canada A1B 3V6

Received 17 February 2013; Accepted 12 May 2013

Academic Editors: E. Brunner, S. Dastgiri, H. R. Searight, and V. K. Sharma

Copyright © 2013 Marshall Godwin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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