Table of Contents
ISRN Family Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 541604, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2013/541604
Research Article

The General Practitioner’s Consultation Approaches to Medically Unexplained Symptoms: A Qualitative Study

1Research Unit for General Practice, Aarhus University, Vennelyst Boulevard 6, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark
2Research Clinic for Functional Disorders, Aarhus University Hospital, Nørrebrogade 44, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark
3Research Unit for General Practice, Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, 9037 Tromsø, Norway

Received 9 August 2012; Accepted 2 September 2012

Academic Editors: M. Menchetti, A. O Brien, N. H. Rasmussen, R. Ruiz-Moral, and N. D. Sulaiman

Copyright © 2013 Henriette Schou Hansen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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