Table of Contents
ISRN Forestry
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 542380, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/542380
Research Article

Spatial Dispersal of Douglas-Fir Beetle Populations in Colorado and Wyoming

1Anadarko Industries, LLC, 500 Dallas, Suite 2750, Houston, TX 77002, USA
2USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, 240 West Prospect Road, Fort Collins, CO 80525, USA
3Softec Solutions, Inc., 384 Inverness Parkwy, Ste 211, Englewood, CO 80112, USA
4USDA-FS Forest Health Technology Enterprise Team, NRRC Building A, Suite 331, 2150 Centre Avenue, Fort Collins, CO 80526, USA
5USDA Forest Service, Region 10 Forest Health Protection and Pacific Northwest Research Station, 3301 C Street, Suite 202 Anchorage, AK 99503, USA

Received 1 October 2012; Accepted 10 December 2012

Academic Editors: D. Huber and G. Martinez Pastur

Copyright © 2013 John R. Withrow et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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