Table of Contents
ISRN Hematology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 568928, 21 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/568928
Review Article

The Modern Primitives: Applying New Technological Approaches to Explore the Biology of the Earliest Red Blood Cells

Disciplines of Physiology, Anatomy and Histology, Bosch Institute, School of Medical Sciences, University of Sydney, Medical Foundation Building K25, 92-94 Parramatta Road, Camperdown, NSW 2050, Australia

Received 30 July 2013; Accepted 25 August 2013

Academic Editors: S. J. Brandt, W. Fiedler, and K. Oritani

Copyright © 2013 Stuart T. Fraser. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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