Table of Contents
ISRN Vascular Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 593517, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/593517
Review Article

MicroRNAs in Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine: Directing Tissue Repair and Cellular Differentiation

1Division of Cardiology, University Medical Center Utrecht and Department of Cardiology, DH&L, Heidelberglaan 100, Room G02.523, 3584 CX Utrecht, The Netherlands
2ICIN, Netherlands Heart Institute, Holland Heart House, Catharijnesingel 52, 3511 GC Utrecht, The Netherlands

Received 25 November 2012; Accepted 14 December 2012

Academic Editors: J. S. Isenberg, D. D. Roberts, D. Sander, and Y. Tohno

Copyright © 2013 Joost P. G. Sluijter. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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