Table of Contents
ISRN Ecology
Volume 2013, Article ID 619393, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/619393
Research Article

Evaluating the Structure of Enemy Biodiversity Effects on Prey Informs Pest Management

1Corso Vittorio Emanuele II No. 50, 09124 Cagliari, Italy
2Dipartimento per la Ricerca nelle Produzioni Vegetali (DIRVE), Agris Sardegna, Viale Trieste No. 111, 09123 Cagliari, Italy

Received 29 May 2013; Accepted 5 August 2013

Academic Editors: T. J. DeWitt and S. N. Francoeur

Copyright © 2013 Paolo Casula and Mauro Nannini. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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