Table of Contents
ISRN Stroke
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 620186, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/620186
Research Article

Delirium in Acute Stroke: A Survey of Screening and Diagnostic Practice in Scotland

1School of Health Sciences, Queen Margaret University, Queen Margaret University Drive, Edinburgh EH21 6UU, UK
2Institute for Applied Health Research and School of Health and Life Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow G0 4BA, UK
3Geriatric Medicine, Clinical and Surgical Sciences, The University of Edinburgh, Room S1642, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Little France Crescent, Edinburgh EH16 4SA, UK

Received 5 June 2013; Accepted 16 July 2013

Academic Editors: R. P. Kessels, P. A. Nyquist, and J. Van Der Grond

Copyright © 2013 Gail Carin-Levy et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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