Table of Contents
ISRN Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2013, Article ID 621836, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2013/621836
Research Article

Extensive Phenotypic Diversity among South Chinese Dogs

1College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, University of Iowa, 143 Biology Building, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
2Division of Gene Technology, School of Biotechnology, Science for Life Laboratory, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 171 65 Solna, Sweden

Received 2 June 2012; Accepted 20 June 2012

Academic Editors: J. M. Eirin-Lopez, G. Glöckner, M. L. Hale, and J. Trueman

Copyright © 2013 Marie-Dominique Crapon de Caprona and Peter Savolainen. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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