Table of Contents
ISRN Bioinformatics
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 640518, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/640518
Research Article

Discovery of YopE Inhibitors by Pharmacophore-Based Virtual Screening and Docking

Department of Chemical Engineering, Boğaziçi University, 34342 Istanbul, Turkey

Received 12 June 2013; Accepted 28 August 2013

Academic Editors: Z. Gáspári, D. Labudde, and D. A. McClellan

Copyright © 2013 Gizem Ozbuyukkaya et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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