Table of Contents
ISRN Pain
Volume 2013, Article ID 640690, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/640690
Review Article

A Health- and Resource-Oriented Perspective on NSLBP

Department of Work and Organizational Psychology, Institute of Psychology, University of Bern, Fabrikstrasse 8, 3012 Bern, Switzerland

Received 26 June 2013; Accepted 4 August 2013

Academic Editors: M. Haas, G. Sandblom, and M. Tsuruoka

Copyright © 2013 Cornelia Rolli Salathé and Achim Elfering. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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