Table of Contents
ISRN Oxidative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 657672, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/657672
Research Article

Amelioration of Sarcoptic Mange-Induced Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis in Dogs by Using Calendula officinalis Flower Extracts

1Division of Medicine, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar, Bareilly 243 122, India
2Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Science and Animal Husbandry, DUVASU, Mathura 281 001, India

Received 4 June 2013; Accepted 2 September 2013

Academic Editors: F. Antunes, P. Leroy, and A. Shukla

Copyright © 2013 Shanker K. Singh and Umesh Dimri. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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