Table of Contents
ISRN Addiction
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 674534, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/674534
Review Article

Neuropsychological Functions of μ- and δ-Opioid Systems

Moscow Research and Practical Center for Narcology, Department of Healthcare, 37/1 Lyublinskaya ul., Moscow 109390, Russia

Received 31 October 2013; Accepted 8 December 2013

Academic Editors: J. C. Chen and G. Herradon

Copyright © 2013 Anna G. Polunina and Evgeny A. Bryun. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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