Table of Contents
ISRN Microbiology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 703813, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/703813
Review Article

Viable but Nonculturable Bacteria: Food Safety and Public Health Perspective

1Industrial Microbiology Laboratory, Institute of Food Science and Technology (IFST), Bangladesh Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (BCSIR), Dhaka, Bangladesh
2Center for Food and Waterborne Diseases, icddr, b, Dhaka, Bangladesh
3Oakden-Osmosis, Australia

Received 7 August 2013; Accepted 1 September 2013

Academic Editors: H.-P. Horz, R. E. Levin, and J. L. McKillip

Copyright © 2013 Md. Fakruddin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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