Table of Contents
ISRN Zoology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 760349, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/760349
Review Article

A Review on Animal Hybridization’s Role in Evolution and Conservation: Canis rufus (Audubon and Bachman) 1851—A Case Study

Departamento de Paleontologia e Geologia, Museu Nacional/UFRJ, Quinta da Boa Vista s/n, São Cristóvão, 20940-040 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil

Received 30 September 2013; Accepted 12 November 2013

Academic Editors: V. Ketmaier and T. H. Struck

Copyright © 2013 Rodrigo Vargas Pêgas. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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