Table of Contents
ISRN Microbiology
Volume 2013, Article ID 816713, 26 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/816713
Review Article

Unified Theory of Bacterial Sialometabolism: How and Why Bacteria Metabolize Host Sialic Acids

Laboratory of Sialobiology, Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61802, USA

Received 3 September 2012; Accepted 27 September 2012

Academic Editors: S. H. Flint and J. Ruiz-Herrera

Copyright © 2013 Eric R. Vimr. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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