Table of Contents
ISRN Virology
Volume 2013, Article ID 830396, 24 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2013/830396
Review Article

Japanese Encephalitis Virus Generated Neurovirulence, Antigenicity, and Host Immune Responses

Department of Zoology, D D U Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur 273009, India

Received 14 May 2013; Accepted 6 June 2013

Academic Editors: M. Magnani and C. Torti

Copyright © 2013 Ravi Kant Upadhyay. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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