Table of Contents
ISRN Zoology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 841734, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/841734
Research Article

Out of Asia: An Allopatric Model for the Evolution of the Domestic Dog

1Biology Department, Washington University, Box 1137, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA
2Anthropology Department, Physical Anthropology, City University New York, 535 East 80th Street, New York, NY 10075, USA

Received 29 June 2013; Accepted 28 August 2013

Academic Editors: A. Arslan, J. J. Gros-Louis, and M. Klautau

Copyright © 2013 Stan Braude and Justin Gladman. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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