Table of Contents
ISRN Neurology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 875834, 48 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/875834
Review Article

Neurochemical and Behavioral Features in Genetic Absence Epilepsy and in Acutely Induced Absence Seizures

1Institute of Higher Nervous Activity and Neurophysiology, Russian Academy of Science, Russian Federation, 5A Butlerov Street, Moscow 117485, Russia
2Biological Psychology, Donders Centre for Cognition, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behavior, Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9104, 6500 HE Nijmegen, The Netherlands

Received 21 January 2013; Accepted 6 February 2013

Academic Editors: R. L. Macdonald, Y. Wang, and E. M. Wassermann

Copyright © 2013 A. S. Bazyan and G. van Luijtelaar. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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