Table of Contents
ISRN Psychiatry
Volume 2013, Article ID 876171, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/876171
Clinical Study

Disrupted Central Inhibition after Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation of Motor Cortex in Schizophrenia with Long-Term Antipsychotic Treatment

1National Institute for Health and Welfare, Forensic Psychiatry, P.O. Box 30, 00271 Helsinki, Finland
2Psychiatric Hospital for Prisoners, P.O. Box 49, 20251 Turku, Finland
3BioMag Laboratory, Helsinki University Hospital HUCH, P.O. Box 340, 00029 Helsinki, Finland
4Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Helsinki University Hospital, P.O. Box 1020, 10601 Ekenäs, Finland
5Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 553, 33101 Tampere, Finland

Received 9 January 2013; Accepted 4 February 2013

Academic Editors: C. M. Beasley and P. Gourzis

Copyright © 2013 Aulikki Ahlgrén-Rimpiläinen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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