Table of Contents
ISRN Environmental Chemistry
Volume 2013, Article ID 930573, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/930573
Research Article

Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry Identification of Labile Radicals Formed during Pyrolysis of Catechool, Hydroquinone, and Phenol through Neutral Pyrolysis Product Mass Analysis

1Laboratory of Applied Ecology, Faculty of Agronomic Sciences, University of Abomey-Calavi, 03 BP 3908 Cotonou, Benin
2Laboratoire de Science et Technique de l’Eau, Ecole Polytechnique d’Abomey-Calavi, Universite d’Abomey-Calavi, 04 BP 0823 Cotonou, Benin
3Laboratoire d’Hydrologie Appliquee, Universite d’Abomey-Calavi, BP 526 Abomey-Calavi, Benin

Received 7 October 2013; Accepted 28 November 2013

Academic Editors: M. Millet and Q. Zhou

Copyright © 2013 Julien Adounkpe et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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