Table of Contents
ISRN Preventive Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 935487, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2013/935487
Research Article

PreView: Development and Pilot Testing of an Interactive Video Doctor Plus Provider Alert to Increase Cancer Screening

1Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
2Division of Behavioral Sciences, Professionalism and Ethics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
3Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA

Received 4 September 2012; Accepted 15 October 2012

Academic Editors: I. Adam, C. E. Cavasini, and C. R. González Bonilla

Copyright © 2013 Millie Arora et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Interventions to increase recommended cancer screening tests and discussions are needed. Methods. We developed the PREventive VIdeo Education in Waiting Rooms Program (PreView), a multimedia cancer prevention intervention for primary care clinics based on the Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change. We pilot tested PreView, an interactive Video Doctor plus Provider Alert for feasibility and acceptability in primary care clinic settings in the San Francisco Bay Area , CA in 2009-2010. Results. Eighty participants (33 men and 47 women; more than half non-White) at 5 primary care clinics were included. After PreView, 87% of women were definitely interested in mammography when due, and 77% were definitely interested in a Pap test. 73% of participants were definitely interested in colorectal cancer screening when due, and 79% of men were definitely interested in a discussion about the PSA test. The majority indicated that they received an appropriate amount of information from PreView and that the information presented helped them decide whether or not to be screened. Conclusions. PreView was well received and accepted and potentially provides an innovative and practical way to support physicians' efforts to increase cancer screening.