Table of Contents
ISRN Genetics
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 952518, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2013/952518
Review Article

Study Designs in Genetic Epidemiology

1Tuberculosis and Lung Disease Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran
2Tabriz Health Services Management Research Centre, Department of Community and Family Medicine, School of Medicine, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 5166615739, Iran
3Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran
4Department of Plant Breeding and Biotechnology, School of Agriculture, University of Tabriz, Iran

Received 16 March 2013; Accepted 15 April 2013

Academic Editors: M. M. DeAngelis, J. Moreaux, and X.-X. Zhang

Copyright © 2013 Leyla Sahebi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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