Table of Contents
ISRN Neurology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 964572, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/964572
Clinical Study

The Cooling Effect on Proinflammatory Cytokines Interferon-Gamma, Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha, and Nitric Oxide in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

1Division of Neuroimmunology, Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Dokuz Eylül University, 35345 İzmir, Turkey
2Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Dokuz Eylül University, 35345 İzmir, Turkey
3Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation, Faculty of Medicine, Dokuz Eylül University, 35345 İzmir, Turkey

Received 3 March 2013; Accepted 4 April 2013

Academic Editors: P. Annunziata, Y. Ohyagi, A. K. Petridis, L. Srivastava, and W. Zhao

Copyright © 2013 Turan Poyraz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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