Table of Contents
ISRN Epidemiology
Volume 2013, Article ID 970386, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2013/970386
Research Article

The Epidemiological Implications of Deer Fly Nuisance Biting and Transmission of Loiasis in an Endemic Area in Southeastern Nigeria

Department of Biological Sciences, Cross River University of Technology, PMB 1123, Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria

Received 2 October 2012; Accepted 18 October 2012

Academic Editors: P. E. Cattan, J. Lewsey, and C. Raynes-Greenow

Copyright © 2013 Emmanuel Chukwunenye Uttah. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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