Table of Contents
ISRN Veterinary Science
Volume 2014, Article ID 148597, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/148597
Research Article

Malignancy Associated MicroRNA Expression Changes in Canine Mammary Cancer of Different Malignancies

1Institute of Veterinary Pathology, Freie Universität Berlin, Robert-von-Ostertag-Straße 15, 14163 Berlin, Germany
2Molecular Pulmonology, German Center for Lung Research, Philipps Universität Marburg, Hans-Meerwein-Straße 2, 35043 Marburg, Germany

Received 11 February 2014; Accepted 18 March 2014; Published 2 April 2014

Academic Editors: M. H. Kogut and A. Shamay

Copyright © 2014 Marie-Charlotte von Deetzen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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