Table of Contents
ISRN Stroke
Volume 2014, Article ID 231725, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/231725
Research Article

Young Women Stroke Survivors and Their Desire for Peer Support

Department of Sociology, Lakehead University, 955 Oliver Road, Thunder Bay, ON, Canada P7B 5E1

Received 6 October 2013; Accepted 5 December 2013; Published 2 January 2014

Academic Editors: R. P. Kessels and A. S. Pickard

Copyright © 2014 Sharon-Dale Stone. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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