Table of Contents
International Scholarly Research Notices
Volume 2014, Article ID 257248, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/257248
Review Article

Motor Activity in Aging: An Integrated Approach for Better Quality of Life

1Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Research Council, Via Moruzzi 1, 56125 Pisa, Italy
2The BioRobotics Institute, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Polo Sant’Anna Valdera, Viale Rinaldo Piaggio 34, Pontedera, 56025 Pisa, Italy
3Department of Surgery, Medical, Molecular and Critical Area Pathology, University of Pisa, Via Paradisa 2, 56100 Pisa, Italy

Received 7 July 2014; Accepted 19 October 2014; Published 24 November 2014

Academic Editor: Maria Fiatarone Singh

Copyright © 2014 Lorenza Pratali et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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