Table of Contents
International Scholarly Research Notices
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 263241, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/263241
Research Article

Outcome in Women with Traumatic Brain Injury Admitted to a Level 1 Trauma Center

1Neurology and Neurosurgery Department, McGill University Health Centre, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, QC, Canada H3G 1A4
2Psychology Department, University of Montreal, C.P. 6128 Succ. Centre-Ville, Montreal, QC, Canada H3C 3J7
3Traumatic Brain Injury Program, McGill University Health Centre, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, QC, Canada H3G 1A4
4Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Service, McGill University Health Centre, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, QC, Canada H3G 1A4
5Social and Preventive Medicine Department, University of Montreal, 7107 Avenue du Parc, Montreal, QC, Canada H3N 1X7

Received 10 April 2014; Accepted 4 June 2014; Published 3 August 2014

Academic Editor: Antonio Di Carlo

Copyright © 2014 Elaine de Guise et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. The aim of this study was to compare acute outcome between men and women after sustaining a traumatic brain injury (TBI). Methods. A total of 5,642 patients admitted to the Traumatic Brain Injury Program of the McGill University Health Centre-Montreal General Hospital between 2000 and 2011 and diagnosed with a TBI were included in the study. The overall percentage of women with TBI was 30.6% ( ). Outcome measures included the length of stay (LOS), the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE), the functional independence measure instrument (FIM), discharge destination, and mortality rate. Results. LOS, GOSE, the FIM ratings, and discharge destination did not show significant differences between genders once controlling for several confounding variables and running the appropriate diagnostic tests ( ). However, women had less chance of dying during their acute care hospitalization than men of the same age, with the same TBI severity and following the same mechanism of injury. Although gender was a statistically significant predictor, its contribution in explaining variation in mortality was small. Conclusion. More research is needed to better understand gender differences in mortality; as to date, the research findings remain inconclusive.