Table of Contents
International Scholarly Research Notices
Volume 2014, Article ID 309404, 39 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/309404
Review Article

Transendothelial Transport and Its Role in Therapeutics

Department of Zoology, DDU Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur 273009, UP, India

Received 15 April 2014; Revised 13 June 2014; Accepted 18 June 2014; Published 27 August 2014

Academic Editor: Athanasios K. Petridis

Copyright © 2014 Ravi Kant Upadhyay. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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