Table of Contents
ISRN Biochemistry
Volume 2014, Article ID 351959, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/351959
Review Article

Tumor Microenvironment: A New Treatment Target for Cancer

1Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
2Graduate Institute of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
3Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
4Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
5Department of Medical Research, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
6Institute of Medical Science and Technology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan

Received 12 January 2014; Accepted 3 March 2014; Published 13 April 2014

Academic Editors: R. Curi, A. Tavares, and Q. Zhang

Copyright © 2014 Ming-Ju Tsai et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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