Table of Contents
ISRN Veterinary Science
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 409547, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/409547
Review Article

Expression and Regulation of Facilitative Glucose Transporters in Equine Insulin-Sensitive Tissue: From Physiology to Pathology

Department of Physiology Sciences, Center of Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078, USA

Received 10 October 2013; Accepted 9 December 2013; Published 4 March 2014

Academic Editors: Y.-F. Chang and J. Foreman

Copyright © 2014 Véronique A. Lacombe. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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