Table of Contents
International Scholarly Research Notices
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 421457, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/421457
Research Article

Dynamic of Plant Composition and Regeneration following Windthrow in a Temperate Beech Forest

Faculty of Natural Resources & Marine Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Mazandaran, Noor 46417-76489, Iran

Received 19 March 2014; Accepted 27 May 2014; Published 22 July 2014

Academic Editor: Guillermo Martinez Pastur

Copyright © 2014 Sakineh Mollaei Darabi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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