Table of Contents
ISRN Botany
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 514294, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/514294
Research Article

The Effect of Phosphorus Reduction and Competition on Invasive Lemnids: Life Traits and Nutrient Uptake

Plant Biology and Nature Management (APNA), Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels, Belgium

Received 14 December 2013; Accepted 3 January 2014; Published 10 February 2014

Academic Editors: R. B. Peterson and T. L. Weir

Copyright © 2014 Joëlle Gérard and Ludwig Triest. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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