Table of Contents
International Scholarly Research Notices
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 523924, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/523924
Review Article

Mechanisms of Myofascial Pain

Krasnow Institute for Advanced Study, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, MNS 2A1, Fairfax, VA 22030, USA

Received 16 March 2014; Revised 8 June 2014; Accepted 10 June 2014; Published 18 August 2014

Academic Editor: Kazuhisa Nishizawa

Copyright © 2014 M. Saleet Jafri. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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