Table of Contents
ISRN Obesity
Volume 2014, Article ID 540582, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/540582
Research Article

Downregulation of RelA (p65) by Rapamycin Inhibits Murine Adipocyte Differentiation and Reduces Fat Mass of C57BL/6J Mice despite High Fat Diet

1Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic Surgery, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1670 University Boulevard, VHG94, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA
2Boston Children’s Hospital, Department of Plastic and Oral Surgery, Boston, MA 02115, USA
3Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Department of Anesthesiology, Wuhan, Hubei 430060, China

Received 8 October 2013; Accepted 20 November 2013; Published 23 January 2014

Academic Editors: B. Navia and C. H. Wu

Copyright © 2014 Peter D. Ray et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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