Table of Contents
International Scholarly Research Notices
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 568081, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/568081
Research Article

Influence of Sulfur Induced Stress on Oxidative Status and Antioxidative Machinery in Leaves of Allium cepa L.

Plant Nutrition and Stress Physiology Laboratory, Department of Botany, University of Lucknow, Lucknow 226007, India

Received 25 March 2014; Accepted 4 August 2014; Published 29 October 2014

Academic Editor: Joël R. Drevet

Copyright © 2014 Neelam Chandra and Nalini Pandey. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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