Table of Contents
ISRN Neurology
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 587302, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/587302
Research Article

Nonmotor Symptoms in Early- and Advanced-Stage Parkinson’s Disease Patients on Dopaminergic Therapy: How Do They Correlate with Quality of Life?

1Second Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University, Limbova 5, 833 05 Bratislava, Slovakia
2Laboratory of Motor Control, Institute of Normal and Pathological Physiology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Sienkiewiczova 1, 813 71 Bratislava, Slovakia
3Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Comenius University, Odbojárov 10, 832 32 Bratislava, Slovakia
4Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Slovak Medical University, Ruzinovska 6, 826 06 Bratislava, Slovakia

Received 16 January 2014; Accepted 9 February 2014; Published 6 March 2014

Academic Editors: A. Bowirrat and D. T. Dexter

Copyright © 2014 Peter Valkovic et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

To determine the impact of nonmotor symptoms (NMS) on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) we examined 100 Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients on dopaminergic medications. An “early-stage” (ES) and an “advanced-stage” (AS) groups were formed. HRQoL was established by the questionnaire PDQ-8, number of NMS by NMSQuest, and severity and frequency of NMS by the assessment scale NMSS. The total NMS averaged 11.3 , . The NMSS domain correlation profiles for ES and AS did not fundamentally differ; however, the domains attention/memory and mood/apathy correlated moderately to strongly with HRQoL in ES, while the sleep/fatigue domain correlated moderately with HRQoL in AS. Weakly correlating domains were sleep/fatigue in ES and cardiovascular, attention/memory, and mood/apathy domains in AS. In view of these findings we strongly recommend systematic, active screening and therapy for neuropsychiatric disorders (mood, cognitive and sleep disorders, and fatigue) at the initial diagnosis and throughout the entire course of PD.