Table of Contents
ISRN Nutrition
Volume 2014, Article ID 650264, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/650264
Review Article

Effects of Commercially Available Dietary Supplements on Resting Energy Expenditure: A Brief Report

1Department of Health, Exercise and Sports Science, University of New Mexico, USA
2Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, USA
3Department of IFCE: Nutrition, University of New Mexico, USA

Received 18 September 2013; Accepted 10 October 2013; Published 2 January 2014

Academic Editors: H. Schröder, C. Soulage, and M. Tesauro

Copyright © 2014 Roger A. Vaughan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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