Table of Contents
International Scholarly Research Notices
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 923290, 21 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/923290
Review Article

Sources of Error in Substance Use Prevalence Surveys

Survey Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Chicago, 412 S. Peoria Street, Chicago, IL 60607, USA

Received 30 April 2014; Accepted 13 October 2014; Published 5 November 2014

Academic Editor: David A. Sleet

Copyright © 2014 Timothy P. Johnson. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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