Table of Contents
International Scholarly Research Notices
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 6859230, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6859230
Research Article

The Ethanolic Stem-Bark Extract of Antrocaryon micraster Inhibits Carrageenan-Induced Pleurisy and Pedal Oedema in Murine Models of Inflammation

1Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science & Technology (KNUST), Kumasi, Ghana
2Department of Pathology, School of Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science & Technology (KNUST), Kumasi, Ghana

Correspondence should be addressed to David D. Obiri

Received 25 February 2017; Revised 29 May 2017; Accepted 13 June 2017; Published 17 July 2017

Academic Editor: Suhel Parvez

Copyright © 2017 Leslie B. Essel et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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