Table of Contents
Journal of Allergy
Volume 2010, Article ID 157249, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/157249
Research Article

Residential Proximity to Freeways is Associated with Uncontrolled Asthma in Inner-City Hispanic Children and Adolescents

1Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Los Angeles County and University of Southern California Medical Center, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA
2Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA
3Southern California Chapter, Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, Los Angeles, CA 90036, USA
4Division of Allergy-Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA

Received 10 November 2009; Accepted 24 March 2010

Academic Editor: William E. Berger

Copyright © 2010 Peter Huynh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Proximity to heavy traffic has been linked to increased asthma severity. However, it is unknown whether exposure to heavy traffic is associated with the ability to maintain asthma control. Objectives. This study examines whether exposure to heavy traffic is associated with the ability to maintain asthma control in inner-city children. Methods. 756 inner-city asthmatic Hispanic children were followed for one year in a pediatric asthma management program (Breathmobile). At each scheduled visit, asthma specialist tracked patients' asthma severity and managed their asthma based on the NAEPP guidelines. The patients' residential distance from the nearest freeway was calculated based on residential address at study entry. Distance to nearest freeway was used as a surrogate marker for high exposure from traffic-related air pollutants. Results. Patients who lived near a freeway were significantly more likely to have asthma that was not well controlled ( 𝑃 = . 0 3 ). Patients with intermittent and mild baseline severity have a two-fold increased risk of having asthma that is uncontrolled if they lived < 2  miles from a freeway ( O R = 2 . 2 , 𝑃 = . 0 4 ). Conclusion. In children with asthma, residential proximity to freeways is associated with uncontrolled asthma.