Table of Contents
Journal of Allergy
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 4850940, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4850940
Research Article

Validation of the English Version of the Scale for Psychosocial Factors in Food Allergy and the Relationship with Mental Health, Quality of Life, and Self-Efficacy

1Psychology, School of Life and Health Sciences, Aston University, Birmingham, UK
2Orthopaedic Department, Universidad de Chile Clinical Hospital, Santiago, Chile
3Psychology, College of Life and Natural Sciences, University of Derby, Derby, UK

Received 31 March 2016; Accepted 7 August 2016

Academic Editor: Eugene R. Bleecker

Copyright © 2016 Rebecca C. Knibb et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. The Scale for Psychosocial Factors in Food Allergy (SPS-FA) is based on the biopsychosocial model of health and was developed and validated in Chile to measure the interaction between psychological variables and allergy symptoms in the child. We sought to validate this scale in an English speaking population and explore its relationship with parental quality of life, self-efficacy, and mental health. Methods. Parents () from the general population in the UK, who had a child with a clinical diagnosis of food allergy, completed the SPS-FA and validated scales on food allergy specific parental quality of life (QoL), parental self-efficacy, and general mental health. Findings. The SPS-FA had good internal consistency (alphas = .61–.86). Higher scores on the SPS-FA significantly correlated with poorer parental QoL, self-efficacy, and mental health. All predictors explained 57% of the variance in SPS-FA scores with QoL as the biggest predictor (). Discussion. The SPS-FA is a valid scale for use in the UK and provides a holistic view of the impact of food allergy on the family. In conjunction with health-related QoL measures, it can be used by health care practitioners to target care for patients and evaluate psychological interventions for improvement of food allergy management.