Journal of Allergy

Smooth Muscle Hypercontractility in Airway Hyperresponsiveness: Innate, Acquired, or Nonexistent?


Publishing date
17 Aug 2012
Status
Published
Submission deadline
30 Mar 2012

Lead Editor

1University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6Z 1Y6

2University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, USA

3University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 9HN, UK

4Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Canada J1H 5N4


Smooth Muscle Hypercontractility in Airway Hyperresponsiveness: Innate, Acquired, or Nonexistent?

Description

Asthma symptoms are triggered/exacerbated by a range of environmental factors, such as allergens, viruses, fungi, exercise, aspirin, or pollutants. Hitherto considered a disease, asthma is henceforth viewed by many as an environmental syndrome with a heterogeneous pathogenesis. Its diagnostic signature is the reversibility of airway obstruction by drug relaxing the airway smooth muscle (ASM), confirming the importance of this tissue in asthma symptoms. Most asthmatics are also hyperresponsive to a bronchoprovocative challenge with a contractile agonist. However, the involvement of ASM in airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), apart from its undisputed role in airway responsiveness, is still uncertain. This is mainly due to our inability to assess ASM function in vivo.

The argument that asthmatic ASM is stronger has lost favor when ASM was isolated from the lungs and studied ex vivo. Since other ASM properties, apart from its force-generating capacity, may contribute to the manifestation of AHR (e.g., maximal amount of shortening, velocity of shortening, stiffness, ability to relax, and ability to tolerate or recover from oscillating stresses occurring in vivo due to breathing maneuvers), more comparisons are needed between asthmatic and nonasthmatic ASM. Nevertheless, the current bulk of evidence suggests that the ASM is ‘normal’ in asthmatics but may cause AHR upon activation because of nonmuscle factors, such as the thickening of the airway wall which increases airway narrowing for any given degree of ASM shortening.

Alternatively, the hypercontractile phenotype can be exclusively present in vivo, when the ASM is exposed to asthma triggers and/or inflammatory/immunologic mediators that ensue. In fact, just as the degree of airway responsiveness, which is variable in time and in response to interventions, many ASM properties are not static (fixed) but rather plastic (adaptable). The plasticity of ASM can contribute to the variable component of airway responsiveness and contribute to AHR in asthmatics, not because the ASM is ‘abnormal’ but because it operates in a ‘sick’ environment in which it acquires a hypercontractile phenotype.

We are interested in papers that will either ignite or shed light on this overall imbroglio. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Innovative tools and techniques to assess ASM contractility in vivo or in an ex vivo setting that better mimics the in vivo situation
  • Comparison of asthmatic and nonasthmatic ASM properties, from humans or animal models
  • Nonmuscle tissues in the development or manifestation of AHR
  • Asthma triggers on ASM contractility or Ca2+ signaling
  • Cytokines or other endogenous mediators that are produced in response to asthma triggers on ASM contractility or Ca2+ signaling

Before submission authors should carefully read over the journal's Author Guidelines, which are located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ja/guidelines/. Prospective authors should submit an electronic copy of their complete manuscript through the journal Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/ according to the following timetable:


Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2013
  • - Article ID 938046
  • - Editorial

Smooth Muscle Hypercontractility in Airway Hyperresponsiveness: Innate, Acquired, or Nonexistent?

Ynuk Bossé | Éric Rousseau | ... | Michael M. Grunstein
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2013
  • - Article ID 185971
  • - Review Article

Airway Smooth Muscle Hypercontractility in Asthma

Rachid Berair | Fay Hollins | Christopher Brightling
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 156909
  • - Review Article

Accumulating Evidence for Increased Velocity of Airway Smooth Muscle Shortening in Asthmatic Airway Hyperresponsiveness

Gijs Ijpma | Oleg Matusovsky | Anne-Marie Lauzon
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 289468
  • - Review Article

Altered CD38/Cyclic ADP-Ribose Signaling Contributes to the Asthmatic Phenotype

Joseph A. Jude | Mythili Dileepan | ... | Mathur S. Kannan
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 108149
  • - Review Article

Neuronal Modulation of Airway and Vascular Tone and Their Influence on Nonspecific Airways Responsiveness in Asthma

Brendan J. Canning | Ariel Woo | Stuart B. Mazzone
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 768982
  • - Review Article

A Brief History of Airway Smooth Muscle’s Role in Airway Hyperresponsiveness

C. D. Pascoe | L. Wang | ... | P. D. Paré
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 157047
  • - Review Article

Airway Smooth Muscle Dynamics and Hyperresponsiveness: In and outside the Clinic

Peter B. Noble | Thomas K. Ansell | ... | Howard W. Mitchell
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 321949
  • - Review Article

Can We Find Better Bronchodilators to Relieve Asthma Symptoms?

Elizabeth A. Townsend | Peter D. Yim | ... | Charles W. Emala
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 341282
  • - Review Article

Integrin and GPCR Crosstalk in the Regulation of ASM Contraction Signaling in Asthma

Chun Ming Teoh | John Kit Chung Tam | Thai Tran
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 593784
  • - Review Article

Airway Smooth Muscle as a Target in Asthma and the Beneficial Effects of Bronchial Thermoplasty

Luke J. Janssen

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