Table of Contents
Journal of Amino Acids
Volume 2011, Article ID 812540, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/812540
Review Article

The Dynamic Structure of the Estrogen Receptor

1Department of Basic Sciences, The Commonwealth Medical College, Scranton, PA 18510, USA
2Section of Endocrinology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118, USA
3Medical Genetics Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA
4Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Charles Drew University of Medicine and Science, Los Angeles, CA 90059, USA

Received 1 April 2011; Accepted 6 June 2011

Academic Editor: Faizan Ahmad

Copyright © 2011 Raj Kumar et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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