Table of Contents
Journal of Amino Acids
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 805681, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/805681
Research Article

Urea Unfolding Study of E. coli Alanyl-tRNA Synthetase and Its Monomeric Variants Proves the Role of C-Terminal Domain in Stability

Department of Biotechnology and Dr. B. C. Guha Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Calcutta 35, Ballygunge Circular Road, Kolkata 700 019, India

Received 10 August 2015; Accepted 20 September 2015

Academic Editor: Hieronim Jakubowski

Copyright © 2015 Baisakhi Banerjee and Rajat Banerjee. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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