Journal of Artificial Evolution and Applications

Journal of Artificial Evolution and Applications / 2009 / Article
Special Issue

Artificial Evolution Methods in the Biological and Biomedical Sciences

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Research Article | Open Access

Volume 2009 |Article ID 179680 | 9 pages | https://doi.org/10.1155/2009/179680

Evolutionary Selection of Features for Neural Sleep/Wake Discrimination

Academic Editor: Janet Clegg
Received15 Nov 2008
Accepted19 Feb 2009
Published06 May 2009

Abstract

In biomedical signal analysis, artificial neural networks are often used for pattern classification because of their capability for nonlinear class separation and the possibility to efficiently implement them on a microcontroller. Typically, the network topology is designed by hand, and a gradient-based search algorithm is used to find a set of suitable parameters for the given classification task. In many cases, however, the choice of the network architecture is a critical and difficult task. For example, hand-designed networks often require more computational resources than necessary because they rely on input features that provide no information or are redundant. In the case of mobile applications, where computational resources and energy are limited, this is especially detrimental. Neuroevolutionary methods which allow for the automatic synthesis of network topology and parameters offer a solution to these problems. In this paper, we use analog genetic encoding (AGE) for the evolutionary synthesis of a neural classifier for a mobile sleep/wake discrimination system. The comparison with a hand-designed classifier trained with back propagation shows that the evolved neural classifiers display similar performance to the hand-designed networks, but using a greatly reduced set of inputs, thus reducing computation time and improving the energy efficiency of the mobile system.

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Copyright © 2009 Peter Dürr et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


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